Colorado woman charged for feeding deer inside her home

Colorado Parks and Wildlife is warning residents to refrain from feeding deer no matter their intentions

Colorado Parks and Wildlife is warning residents to refrain from feeding deer no matter their intentions

Colorado Parks and Wildlife said a woman was luring deer into her home to feed them trays of human food. The former involved a homeowner feeding deer in his yard often enough that deer would come rushing to him when he stepped outside; the latter involved a woman who filmed herself allowing a large deer to enter her home from her yard.

It's not just the deer - it's also what may follow them there.

After a pair of serious incidents on the Front Range led to criminal charges, Colorado Parks and Wildlife is hoping to remind residents and visitors around the state that feeding wildlife is not only extremely harmful to animals but also illegal. The video continues as she films a buck eating rolled oats cereal, bananas, bread and apples out of a plastic bin on a table.

A number of deer from surrounding properties rushed towards the person within the Burland Ranchettes Subdivision of Bailey who was feeding them, wildlife officers stated.

Each events within the Jefferson and Park counties incidents, who weren't named, have been charged by wildlife officers and violations may embrace a $100 effective per event, a CPW information launch stated.

Officials with CPW confirmed that charges were filed against both offenders. "The proper way to enjoy viewing wildlife is to do so from a safe distance and without artificially introducing feed, salt, or other attractants that alter their natural use of the landscape and aversion to people".

“If you are training deer to come and stay in your backyard you are asking mountain lions to be in your neighborhood as well,” said Mark Lamb an area wildlife manager with Colorado Parks and Wildlife
CPW: Charges filed against Evergreen woman who filmed herself luring deer into home to feed them

"It is selfish and unethical to feed big-game", Area Wildlife Manager Mark Lamb said in the news release.

"They may think it's harmless, they may think it's helpful, they may think that wildlife can't get by during winter, but doing that causes more harm than good", Clay said.

"You are going to end up unintentionally killing those animals and also putting yourself in harm's way", he said. "If what you need is a pet or simply to attach with an animal, select a home breed that has developed to dwell with individuals".

The agency issued a reminder on Monday after two "egregious" incidents of people feeding wild deer were reported to the agency, including one incident that had been recorded on video.

Along with disturbing migration patterns, animals can die if fed the wrong food. The act disrupts wildlife's digestive techniques and it may result in animal deaths.

"If you're coaching deer to return and keep in your yard, you might be asking mountain lions to be in your neighborhood as effectively", Lamb stated.

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