European Union antitrust regulators say they are investigating Google's data collection

A man passes a Google sign outside the company's office in Singapore

EU antitrust regulators seek details of Google’s data practices

European Union antirust regulators have already hit Google with record-breaking fines, but concern remains about how the company collects data about its users as well as how this data is then used.

The EU's executive Commission has handed down fines of more than 8 billion euros (£6.9 billion) to Alphabet unit Google in the last two years and ordered it to change its business practices, following an investigation that showed the company abused its dominance.

The new investigation suggests that the European Union is not yet done with its scrutiny of Google, which has already resulted in more than €8bn (£6.8bn) of fines.

According to a document seen by Reuters, the EU's focus in its preliminary investigation is related to data collected and used in local search services, online advertising, online ad targeting services, login services, web browsers and more.

Foo Yun Chee, reporting for Reuters, said the questionnaires for the latest investigation showed that the EU's focus was on "data related to local search services, online advertising, online ad targeting services, login services, web browsers and others".

Google said it continues to discuss data collection concerns with the EU.

The investigation comes as Google and other Silicon Valley giants face increased scrutiny from government officials and regulators in the US. Meanwhile, House Democrats in June announced their own investigation into tech giants, meant to explore whether the companies are engaging in "anti-competitive conduct".

According to Reuters, regulators are interested to learn about "the kind of data sought by Google, how it uses it and how valuable the companies consider such data".

Google has already earned more than 8 billion Euro in fines over the last two years, making it hard for the company to simply write off the fines as the cost of doing business.

Originally published December 1 at 1:22 p.m. PT.

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