Harvest Moon to rise at a rare and unlucky time of day

Harvest Moon to rise at a rare and unlucky time of day

Harvest Moon to rise at a rare and unlucky time of day

A rare Harvest Moon, also known as a full moon, will illuminate the night sky on Friday, September 13, for the first time in almost 20 years.

A full Harvest Moon will appear on the upcoming Friday the 13th for the first time in nineteen years - and look smaller than usual. It's such a common belief that Scientific American published an article in 2009 examining whether a full moon evokes "strange behavior."

It's also a micromoon, which happens when the full moon is at the point in the moon's orbit where it's at its greatest distance from Earth, called apogee. Don't miss out on this rare and unlucky coincidence.

For most of the nation, the September moon will be full before midnight on Friday.

This full moon also almost coincides with apogee - the point in the moon's orbit that places the it at its greatest distance from earth at 252,100 miles away.

What makes this full moon more special than others is that farmers, at the peak of the current harvest season, can work late into the night by the moon's light. During this time, the moon will rise just 25 to 30 minutes later across the northern USA and only 10 to 20 minutes later for parts of Canada and Europe. The last one occurred on October 13, 2000 - and it won't happen again until 2049, according to the Farmers' Almanac.

In the U.S., the Harvest Moon of 2019 will reach its peak on September 14 at 12:33 am.

Supermoons seem to get a lot of attention these days, but the September 2019 full moon is the opposite - a micromoon.

In February of 2018, the exact opposite happened when a supermoon graced the sky.

Friday's micromoon may appear a little less bright and about 14 percent smaller than a supermoon, according to timeanddate.com.

Normally, the Moon rises an average of 50 minutes after the sunset but the Harvest Moon comes soon after the sunset due to autumn equinox.

Latest News