House Votes for Russia Investigation Final Report Be Public

House endorses making Mueller report public in unanimous 420-0 vote

House poised to pass measure calling for DOJ to publicly release Mueller's report

Andrew Weissmann, who built the case against President Donald Trump's former campaign chairman, is stepping down from the Mueller probe to teach at New York University and resume his civil rights activism, reported NPR. Bipartisan Senate legislation calling for the report to be made public has stalled.

Before Thursday's vote, Rep.

The move is an attempt to "send a clear signal both to the American people and the Department of Justice" that lawmakers expect to see the full account of Mueller's work, according to the House Judiciary Committee's chairman, Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y.

As such, it is not clear if the Republican leader of the Senate, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, will put the resolution on the Senate floor for a vote. Only four Congressmen, all Republicans, voted "present": Reps.

For Democrats, however, passing the resolution was an important gesture, as during his confirmation hearing, Barr refused to pledge to release the full report to the public.

All told, 420 members - 230 Democrats and 190 Republicans - voted for the resolution. He added that it was critical to pass the resolution because of the "many questions and criticisms of the investigation" raised by the Trump administration.

They have argued that the department is obligated to turn information over to Congress, citing document productions related to the FBI investigation of Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server as secretary of state, and the FBI's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Graham said he agrees "with the concept of transparency", but stopped short of supporting Grassley's bill, saying he disagrees with taking discretion away from the attorney general.

Some Democrats have voiced concerned that Barr could withhold evidence of possible misconduct by Trump, under Justice Department policies that oppose bringing criminal charges against a sitting president and discourage releasing explanations when a person has not been charged with a crime.

FBI Director Robert Mueller testifies during the Senate (Select) Intelligence Committee hearing, January 31, 2012.

Some House Democrats already have vowed to subpoena the report and go to court if necessary to win its full release.

The Mueller investigation so far has resulted in indictments against 34 individuals and three companies, seven guilty pleas and one conviction following a jury trial.

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