Serious injuries for trailblazing Sudanese player after bridge fall

AFL to force clubs to hire mental health experts following Daw incident

Serious injuries for trailblazing Sudanese player after bridge fall

The 27-year-old Sudanese player for the North Melbourne side was found late Monday night after it is believed he fell from the Bolte Bridge, a 25 metre high bridge in the CBD.

Daw then took another sedative, Melatonin, before reaching for his auto keys, according to the report.

After calls to implement a stronger mental health plan for its players in light of the incident involving Kangaroos star Majak Daw, the AFL is looking to make it compulsory for clubs to allocate a certain amount of money under its football department cap towards hiring mental health experts.

Club officials have visited Daw in hospital, with the defender expected to undergo surgery within 48 hours for multiple fractures to the hip and pelvis.

"Our primary concern is his mental and physical health and wellbeing, and also the wellbeing of his family, friends, teammates, coaches and staff at the club".

Bartel told Sportsday the AFLPA should have held a press conference to address issues around mental health in the AFL.

Schwass revealed in 2006 that he had suffered depression during his career.

Serious injuries for trailblazing Sudanese player after bridge fall
Serious injuries for trailblazing Sudanese player after bridge fall

Schwass said while some AFL clubs were handling mental health issues well, others could do a lot better. A very serious wake up call, our industry needs to get serious!' His vehicle was found abandoned at the bridge.

Since joining the Kangaroos, Daw has become a key figure in the AFL and the local community.

Having fled war-torn Sudan, Daw and his family moved to Australia in 2003.

As an AFL multicultural ambassador, he has spoken out against racism and is widely considered a role model for aspiring young footballers.

While Schwass, who struggled with depression as a player, believes the game isn't doing almost enough in mental health, the AFL's view is that it has been making inroads in improving this area as awareness has increased.

People seeking help can call Lifeline on 13 11 14, or Beyond Blue on 1300 224 636.

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