Facebook's seized files published by MPs

Facebook exposed Docs dumped by UK show FB whitelisted user data collection for cherry-picked firms

The entrance sign to Facebook headquarters

The British Parliament on Wednesday released a trove of Facebook documents, which it took possession of amid a larger inquiry into Cambridge Analytica, a firm that used Facebook data to profile users for political purposes.

The documents are thought to contain emails from Mark Zuckerberg.

This echoes the accusation made by app developer Six4Three, from whom the documents were seized.

Ted Kramer, the head of an app company Six4Three suing the social network, was last month ordered to hand over internal Facebook emails by Damian Collins, the chair of the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport committee.

About 250 pages have been published, some of which are marked "highly confidential".

The documents, which had been sealed by a California court, led lawmakers to conclude that Facebook undertook deals with third party apps that continued to allow access to personal data.

In his memo, Collins highlighted what his committee determines to be the six key findings from the documents.

Damian Collins, head of the committee, added that Facebook shut off access to data required by competing apps, conducted global surveys of the usage of mobile apps by customers possibly without their knowledge, and that a change to Facebook's Android app policy that resulted in call and message data being recorded was deliberately made hard for users to know about.

Mr Collins alleged that Facebook maintained "whitelisting agreements" which gave select companies preferential access to valuable user data.

In terms of suffocating rivals, Mr Collins wrote: "The files show evidence of Facebook taking aggressive positions against apps, with the outcome that denying them access to data led to the failure of that business".

"We stand by the platform changes we made in 2015 to stop a person from sharing their friends' data with developers", said Facebook's spokeswoman.

"Like any business, we had many internal conversations about the various ways we could build a sustainable business model for our platform. But the facts are clear: we've never sold people's data".

This story is developing.

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