Giant spider-web cloaks Greece coast

In this frame grab taken from video on Sept. 18 2018 a view of spider webs over bushes in Aitoliko Greece

In this frame grab taken from video on Sept. 18 2018 a view of spider webs over bushes in Aitoliko Greece

It sounds like a something out of a horror movie: A town covered in thousands of webs, each crawling with hordes of spiders.

Warmer weather conditions in western Greece have led to the eerie spectacle of a 300m-long spider-web in Aitoliko.

Local resident Giannis Giannakopoulos told CNN that he first noticed the "veil of webs" earlier this week and took photos.

The BBC reported that the spiderwebs are about 1,000 feet in length.

The giant webs are spun by a very small spider of the Tetragnatha genus ― it's just 0.7 inches long, according to Inside Edition.

"When animal finds abundant food, high temperatures and sufficient humidity, it has the ideal conditions to be able to make larger population", she added.

"These spiders are not risky for humans and will not cause any damage to the area's flora", she told Greek outlet Newsit. They thrive in hot, humid temperatures and continue to reproduce during that time. Greek biologist Fotis Pergantis, president of the Messolonghi National Lagoon Park, told CNN that the webs will likely be there until temperatures start to drop and the gnat population dies out.

An increase in the mosquito population is also thought to have contributed to the rise in the number of spiders. "This phenomenon has arisen from a population explosion of this spider".

"It's the simple prey-predator phenomenon".

Molecular Biologist Maria Chatzaki said: "These spiders are not risky for humans and will not cause any damage to the area's flora".

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