Third strawberry brand recalled amid new threats

'If in doubt, throw them out': Needles in strawberries prompt warning

Contaminated strawberries, Queensland – update 1 - Queensland Police News

"It snapped in half, my knee-jerk reaction was to swallow, and I found the other half of the needle in the strawberry", he said.

Woolworths has issued a recall of strawberries, asking customers to return strawberries purchased at stores across the country for a refund.

Queensland's Chief Health Officer Dr Jeanette Young has requested retailers withdraw all Donnybrook strawberries through a trade level recall.

Police have been unable to confirm whether the contaminated products are linked to the original contamination in Queensland or a copycat, however they are urging anyone who has purchased contaminated products to take the punnet to their local police station immediately for forensic testing.

Investigators are looking at "all options and avenues of the packaging and processing of the strawberries", Queensland Police Acting Detective Chief Superintendent Terry Lawrence told 9NEWS.

A strawberry spiked with a needle from the same punnet as the fruit which struck down Brisbane man Hoani Hearne. "We'd be lucky at the moment to get between $3-4 a kilo", Mr Schultz said.

Jennifer Rowling of the Queensland Strawberry Growers' Association said she believed the strawberries had been "interfered with". "The contamination relates to what appears to be needles inserted in strawberries".

She said the punnets were both Delightful Strawberries branded product.

Health authorities are urging people to cut up strawberries to make sure they are safe to eat and police want anyone who finds a needle to contact them.

Back in New Zealand, Foodstuff external relations manager Sue Hamilton says ahead of the New Zealand strawberry season kicking off, New World, PaK'n'Save and Four Square stores are stocking some Australian strawberries.

Amid the contamination, the Queensland Strawberry Growers Association on Wednesday said they suspected that the culprit was possibly a "disgruntled" former employee. "We're keeping a very open mind as to where this may have occurred somewhere between the actual growing of the strawberry through to the completion of the production line and going even further through to distribution and going on to the shelves".

Queensland mum Angela Stevenson told Sunrise she discovered a sewing needle when she was cutting up fruit for her child.

Authorities said on September 13 that they believe that they had mitigated enough risk for customers to buy strawberries again, as all stock had been replaced.

"I don't know, because the problem is there's so many people handling the fruit all the time, and packing, so I can not say where it happened", he told a Channel 9 reporter.

"There is no reason to stop eating strawberries, we just need to be aware of this incident". "It makes it hard because you might need to dispose of them earlier, but just cut them up for safety's sake".

Anyone with information should contact Crimestoppers on 1800 333 000.

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