Blue light emitted from smartphones and laptops accelerates blindness

Smart Phones used to illustrate the story

Smart Phones used to illustrate the story

"We are being exposed to blue light continuously, and the eye's cornea and lens can not block or reflect it", Dr. Ajith Karunarathne, assistant professor in the UT Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, said. Considering that the eyes are constantly exposed to blue light irradiation and it becomes the cause of death of photoreceptor cells in the retina that are responsible for light perception by the brain. He explained that their experiments have shown that this exposure can lead to slow macular degeneration and a new therapy is developed to block this effect.

Macular degeneration, sometimes referred to as age-related macular degeneration or AMD, is a condition that results from the breakdown or thinning of cells in the macula - a part of the eye's retina that's important for seeing fine details. In order to see, Ajith detailed that "You need a continuous supply of retinal molecules if you want to see".

"We are being exposed to blue light continuously, and the eye's cornea and lens can not block or reflect it", said Ajith Karunarathne, assistant professor in the UT Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and one of the authors of the study.

It kills photoreceptor cells, which do not regenerate.

In the lab, the researchers combined retinal with various cells from the body, including photoreceptor cells, neurons, and heart cells. Retinal is a form of vitamin A that changes shape when exposed to light rays.

The eye's cornea and lens can not block or reflect blue light, which has become an unavoidable constant presence for many people.

Scientists have long known blue light from device screens contribute to blindness. Retinal without blue light or blue light without retinal could not kill the cells.

Researchers discovered that a molecule and natural antioxidant called alpha-tocopherol stopped cells from dying but ultimately failed to provide protection to elderly suffers whose immune systems might have been surprised.

"If you look at the amount of light coming out of your cell phone, it's not great but it seems tolerable", Dr.in the UT Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, said.

Our cell phones are practically connected to us.

To protect your eyes from blue light, Karunarathne advises to wear sunglasses that can filter both UV and blue light outside and avoid looking at your cell phones or tablets in the dark.

Dr Karunarathne said: "That is when the real damage occurs".

Kasun Ratnayake, a PhD student at the University of Toledo and one of the authors of the study explained that if the blue light is shone on the retina, it kills the photoreceptor cells of the retina and the signalling molecules called retinal on the retinal membrane dissolves.

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