Who is Brett Kavanaugh, Trump’s Nominee to the Supreme Court?

President Donald Trump talks with Judge Brett Kavanaugh and Kavanaugh’s family after nominating him to the Supreme Court

President Donald Trump talks with Judge Brett Kavanaugh and Kavanaugh’s family after nominating him to the Supreme Court. Alex Brandon AP

His confirmation is complicated by an unusually long record as an appellate judge and as a George W. Bush administration official - and also his role as part of the Kenneth Starr investigation of President Bill Clinton.

While the two issues are closely linked, the change aligns with polling that shows healthcare is a major concern for swing-state voters ahead of November's congressional elections, with abortion rights more divisive.

Derrick Johnson, president and CEO of the NAACP, told Al Jazeera that his organisation's immediate call of action would be to "have its members across the USA express their views to senators in their states and urge them to oppose this nomination".

On Monday, however, Republican Sen.

Republicans hold a 51-49 majority in the Senate.

He said his committee will examine the 300 cases Kavanaugh has made decisions in before bringing the nomination to a vote in the full Senate.

Remember: This is precisely what McConnell flagged for Trump as a potential problem with Kavanaugh's nomination: Never that he wasn't qualified, but that his extensive time in government service, and the documents that come with it, cannot only lead to possible surprises and also give Democrats grounds - legitimate or not - to delay consideration of the nomination.

He also criticised New York Governor Andrew Cuomo for "failing to advance legislation that would protect women's rights on the state level by empowering the right-leaning Independent Democratic Conference (IDC)". Jones is already getting pressure from Republicans back home, including a potential challenger in Jones's 2020 reelection, to support Kavanaugh. He points to a speech Kavanaugh made to the American Enterprise Institute a year ago.

"Now is the time for the American people to make their voices heard, loudly, clearly, from one end of this country to the other". They say Trump might be accused of a crime.

But when the Supreme Court had the shot to decide the issue in 2015, it declined.

At the announcement, Kavanaugh stood with his wife and two daughters and said he was "humbled" by the nomination. Leahy was referring to Kavanaugh's assertion, in a 2009 article in the Minnesota Law Review, that sitting presidents should not be subject to indictments, civil lawsuits or criminal investigations.

He talked about how his mother teaching in Washington D.C. public schools taught him the importance of equality and diversity. At the event, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said that he will fight the nomination "with everything I've got".

If confirmed, Kavanaugh and the court might have to consider a lawsuit by Texas and other states challenging Obamacare's health insurance protections for patients with pre-existing conditions, such as cancer, diabetes and Parkinson's.

Abortion is likely to dominate the debate over Kavanaugh's confirmation.

Republican Senator Lindsey Graham told Fox News on Tuesday that Democratic hopefuls for 2020 feel the need to be "the most insane person" when commenting on President Donald Trump's federal court nominations. He is as sure as any lawyer can be that a woman's right to an abortion will not be overturned.

"I think his confirmation will go well", Hatch said during brief remarks to reporters before meeting more privately with Kavanaugh. He says that without Kennedy, the Supreme Court has strong left and strong right positions, but no one in the middle.

Leonard Leo, Vice President of the Federalist Society, has been called the puppeteer behind Trump's court choices, but that narrative overlooks the influence of McGahn, also a Federalist Society member.

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