Britain's May reasserts her authority after Brexit resignations

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BREXIT BREAKDOWN: UK Foreign Minister QUITS, Theresa May Facing REVOLT

On Monday evening, Johnson was replaced as foreign secretary by Jeremy Hunt, who in turn was replaced as health secretary by Matt Hancock, as the prime minister embarked on a reshuffle to shore up her position. By staying in position, he can also argue that his presence in government is a demonstration of its credibility on Brexit to the party's nervous right wing; if he were to depart in the future, it would be a signal that May has finally lost the confidence of her MPs. While International Development Secretary Penny Morduant immediately welcomed the decision saying Rabb is "highly capable, across the issues, attention to detail, Leave supporter and pragmatist", others said Davis' resignation has plunged Britain into "absolute chaos".

But leading pro-Brexit legislator Jacob Rees-Mogg said "I don't think a no-confidence vote is immediately in the offing".

May's proposals for a future European Union relationship after Britain departs from the bloc next March had taken two years of internal government wrangling to agree.

"The Prime Minister thanks Boris for his work", said a statement from Prime Minister Theresa May.

Described by news site BirminghamLive as the "most popular potential replacement for Theresa May", Home Secretary Javid is widely regarded as one of the front runners for the top role.

Former Foreign Secretary Mr Johnson claimed his Brexit dream "is dying" in his scathing resignation letter.

Mr Johnson wrote: "Brexit should be about opportunity and hope".

Admittedly, Mr Rees-Mogg confirmed that the mood was one of sadness at the European Research Group meeting on Monday once Theresa May had announced her Brexit plans to Parliament.

Boris Johnson quit his post yesterday, following the earlier resignation of Brexit Secretary David Davis, putting the government in a tight spot with less than nine months left to complete the complex Brexit negotiations.

Johnson spoke for angry Conservative Brexit-backers in his resignation letter to May when he complained that voters weren't going to get the things he'd promised them when he campaigned to leave the EU.

Mrs May said she was "sorry - and a little surprised" by Mr Johnson's move after his apparent support on Friday.

Brussels has not yet made clear how the EU27 will respond to the Chequers deal, which the government believes represents an "evolution" of its negotiating strategy.

European Council President Donald Tusk, who leads the EU's political and priority-setting body, said Monday that "the mess caused by Brexit is the biggest problem in the history of EU-U.K. relations and it is still very far from being resolved".

The New Statesman says Leadsom is also "in with a shout" for the leadership, but the Daily Mirror points out that her failed bid to beat May in 2016 could damage her chances.

Under Conservative Party rules, a confidence vote in a leader can be triggered if 15 percent of Conservative lawmakers - now 48 - write a letter requesting one.

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