DUP to back Theresa May over Brexit amendments

May is a hostage to her own party after Brexit non-rebellion

UK government wins key Brexit parliamentary battle

Shadow Brexit Secretary Keir Starmer commented: "This vote was about ensuring parliament was given a proper role in the Brexit negotiations and that we avoid a no deal situation, which is becoming more likely with the divisions at the heart of this government".

If we get into the position in November where there is not a deal that the House of Commons likes and it sets down motions for what the government must do, if it asks for things that the European Union then doesn't give, it will take too long for the government to be able to go back to parliament, back to the European Union to get a deal.

The European Union Withdrawal Bill, a complex piece of legislation meant to disentangle Britain from the bloc, has had a rocky ride through Parliament.

If the government fails to pass the bill as it is, it will be forced to change what it asks for in negotiations with the European Union -undermining May's position and possibly threatening her job as Prime Minister. Yet now, with just hours to go before the parliamentary showdown, the Prime Minister looks as though she has brought her administration back from the brink. Although, as things stand, they will not be able to send the government back into negotiations if they reject an agreement with the EU.

They believe that if there is no Brexit deal by the end of November, the government must clear its next course of action with MPs.

The Government's compromise is that a minister would come to the House within 28 days of a deal being rejected to tell MPs what will happen next, but an amendment tabled by former attorney general Dominic Grieve would insist on a binding Commons motion.

The pro-EU faction got a boost when junior justice minister Phillip Lee resigned Tuesday, saying he could no longer support the government's "irresponsible" plans for Brexit. It also attacked the unelected nature of the House of Lords (which traditionally scrutinizes laws passed to it by the elected lower chamber), linking it to a perceived attempt to frustrate the Brexit process.

Opposition Labour lawmaker Chuka Umunna had earlier accused Britain's tabloids of intimidation, holding up Tuesday's edition of the eurosceptic Daily Express. "They want us to regain control of our borders", he said.

Anna Soubry, a pro-EU Conservative MP, said she knew of one legislator who would not vote with their conscience because of "threats to their personal safety" and that of staff and family.

Davis on Tuesday told the BBC, "that was the decision of the British people. and whatever we do, we're not going to reverse that".

In a day of drama at Westminster, ministers caved into the rebel demands for a "meaningful vote" on Brexit in order to prevent a defeat on the EU Withdrawal bill which could have triggered a leadership crisis for the prime minister.

Latest News