Hurricane Bud is weakening, could hit Mexico as tropical storm

Hurricane Bud Posing Danger Along San Diego Coast

Category 3 Hurricane Bud heads north off Mexican coast

It was centered about 440 miles south-southeast of the tip of the Baja peninsula and was moving northwest at 7 mph.

Hurricane Bud, the second official hurricane in the eastern Pacific Ocean, upgraded to a Category 3 storm on Monday, June 11.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Bud had maximum sustained winds of 120 miles per hour Monday morning.

Bud is expected to produce rainfall accumulations of 75 to 150 millimeters across much of southwestern Mexico and waves of three to four meters in Michoacán, Colima and Jalisco.

"Some additional strengthening is possible today, but a slow weakening trend is expected to begin by early Tuesday". "These rains could cause life-threatening flash floods and mudslides", the agency warned. Meanwhile, Tropical Storm Aletta weakened into remnant low-pressure system in the Pacific, far from the Mexican coast.

The swell also will generate strong rip and side currents, creating hazardous conditions for swimmers and surfers.

There's a chance a tropical depression or storm could develop in the Gulf of Mexico later this week - but it's a low chance as of Monday afternoon.

The Weather Channel reported that the hurricane could prompt a "surge of moisture" in the southwest United States, which would lead to an increase in rain showers and storms.

On top of Irma and Maria, powerful category 4 hurricane Harvey inflicted $125billion worth of damage, mostly from catastrophic flooding in Houston, Texas, between August and September previous year. It was about 600 miles (965 kilometres) southwest of the southern tip of Baja California.

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