Canada's Paralympic team aims to win medals while smashing barriers

Korea Aims for Top-10 Finish at Pyeongchang Paralympics

NK delegation to PyeongChang Paralympics

The Olympics-driven detente has triggered a flurry of diplomatic activity, which culminated in the shock announcement last week that US President Donald Trump had agreed to meet the North's leader Kim Jong Un.

In the men's 7.5km sitting biathlon another American came out on top, with Daniel Cnossen winning gold.

PYEONGCHANG, South Korea The opening ceremony of the biggest Winter Paralympics yet unfolded Friday night with a glittering performance that championed a world of coexistence where differences are embraced and understood.

South and North Korean cross-country skiers carried the torch together, before the flame was used to light the cauldron. The games run until March 18.

The first USA gold of these Paralympics was the first US gold in the biathlon, with Kendall Gretsch winning the women's 6km sitting biathlon, with teammate Oksana Masters capturing the bronze.

Fifty-five athletes are competing on Team Canada during the games, which kicked off Friday in Pyeongchang.

And unlike at the Olympic opening ceremony last month, when athletes from the two Koreas entered the stadium as a unified delegation, the nations marched separately after failing to agree Thursday on conditions for a dual march.

North Korean officials said they do "not accept the fact that Dokdo can not be marked due to political issues held in Korea", Reuters reported.

The nation will contest every sport except curling, with a total of 38 Japanese athletes competing in alpine skiing, cross country skiing, biathlon, para ice hockey and snowboarding.

The first official Paralympic Games took place in 1960, in Rome, Italy, with 400 athletes representing 23 different countries.

The first events begin on Saturday, with athletes competing in downhill skiing and biathlon.

Kim Jong Hyon carries the flag of North Korea as he leads his teammates into the opening ceremony. Thirty athletes, who have met strict conditions, were approved by the International Paralympic Committee to compete as Neutral Paralympic Athletes in Pyeongchang.

Latest News