Trump's New Lawyer for Russia Probe Praises Mueller

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks with Russian President Vladimir Putin at the G20 summit in Hamburg Germany on July 7. REUTERS  Carlos Barria

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks with Russian President Vladimir Putin at the G20 summit in Hamburg Germany on July 7. REUTERS Carlos Barria

The president can't really fire Sessions, Johnson said, because he could risk impeachment for obstruction of justice if his next attorney general fires Mueller.

McConnell, however, can thwart Trump's wholly constitutional strategy by keeping the Senate in session, using a trick he used previous year against President Barack Obama to hold the late Justice Antonin Scalia's high court seat open through the election.

Close to half of the voters in the United States say it would be inappropriate for President Donald Trump to fire Special Counsel Robert Mueller as head of the investigation into Russia's alleged interference in the 2016 U.S. election and the Trump campaign, a new Morning Consult/Politico poll revealed on Wednesday.

A jarring 10 percent of people thought Sean Spicer, the former White House press secretary who resigned this week, was in charge of examining possible connections between Trump's campaign and Russian Federation.

Trump lashed out at Sessions in the media by claiming he would have chosen a different nominee if he'd known in advance about the recusal.

Republican lawmakers are furious about the president's treatment of Sessions, a longtime Senate colleague. Reports have also emerged Mr. Trump is contemplating firing the attorney general.

Democrats plan to stop the president from making a recess appointment by using parliamentary tactics that prevent the usual recess from occurring at all.

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